Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Number pattern

Activity 1
Observe the following and complete the activity that follows:
example 1
 example 2
 example 3
 example 4
example 5
click here for animation
example 6
       
                       
Activity 2
What did you observe about the above examples? Do they have something in common and related to mathematics?


Question:
Are there other types of mathematical patterns ? 
Do a brief research and post your findings.
Use the Linoit to identify other types of numbers or patterns in the world 






Activity 3

Activity 1 Problem solving heuristics
Here is a simple Mathematical problem.

There are 28 students in your classroom. 
On Valentine's Day, every student gives a valentine to each of the other students.
How many valentines are exchanged?



Question:
What are the Mathematical Heuristics that you think will be suitable to solve the above problem?












Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Geometry Part 1

What is Geometry?  
Geometry is a subject in mathematics that focuses on the study of shapes, sizes, relative configurations, and spatial properties. Derived from the Greek word meaning “earth measurement”, geometry is one of the oldest sciences. It was first formally organized by the Greek mathematician Euclid around 300 BC when he arranged 465 geometric propositions into 13 books, titled ‘Elements’.

What are Angle Properties, Postulates, and Theorems? 
In order to study geometry in a logical way, it will be important to understand key mathematical properties and to know how to apply useful postulates and theorems.

Task 1:
Define the following (& # 4, 6 & 8 post as a comment)
  1. Postulate 
  2. Theorem
  3. Transversal
  4. Converse
Nb: suggest you do a personal note or concept map to summarise the various types of geometrical properties.
The syllabus requires you to know the following:
  1. Properties of angles eg. acute, reflect etc
  2. Properties of angles and straight lines
  3. Properties of angles between parallel lines
  4. Properties of Triangle






courtesy of Lincoln Chu S1-02 2010

courtesy of Goh Jia Sheng S1-02 2010

Lets look at some of these Postulates 
A. Corresponding Angles Postulate
If a transversal intersects two parallel lines, the pairs of corresponding angles are congruent. Converse also true: If a transversal intersects two lines and the corresponding angles are congruent, then the lines are parallel.
The figure above yields four pairs of corresponding angles.

B. Parallel Postulate

Given a line and a point not on that line, there exists a unique line through the point parallel to the given line. The parallel postulate is what sets Euclidean geometry apart from non-Euclidean geometry.
There are an infinite number of lines that pass through point E, but only the red line runs parallel to line CD. Any other line through E will eventually intersect line CD.

Angle Theorems

C. Alternate Exterior Angles Theorem

If a transversal intersects two parallel lines, then the alternate exterior angles are congruent.
Converse also true: If a transversal intersects two lines and the alternate exterior angles are congruent, then the lines are parallel.
The alternate exterior angles have the same degree measures because the lines are parallel to each other.

D. Alternate Interior Angles Theorem

If a transversal intersects two parallel lines, then the alternate interior angles are congruent.
Converse also true: If a transversal intersects two lines and the alternate interior angles are congruent, then the lines are parallel.
The alternate interior angles have the same degree measures because the lines are parallel to each other.

E. Same-Side Interior Angles Theorem
If a transversal intersects two parallel lines, then the interior angles on the same side of the transversal are supplementary.
The sum of the degree measures of the same-side interior angles is 180°.

F. Vertical Angles Theorem

If two angles are vertical angles, then they have equal measures.
The vertical angles have equal degree measures. There are two pairs of vertical angles.
sources:
http://www.wyzant.com
http://www.mathsteacher.com.au/year9/ch13_geometry/05_deductive/geometry.htm